Walking Under Gas Pipes

COMAH REGULATIONS 2105

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COURSE OUTLINE

Following several industrial disasters in the late 1960’s and 1970’s, the U.K. moved away from prescriptive legislation on health and safety and instead implemented a legal requirement for continuous improvement.  The Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) regulations seek to ensure that businesses with plants that have inventories over a certain size “take all necessary measures to prevent major accidents involving dangerous substances and limit the consequences to people and the environment of any major accidents which do occur”.

 

COURSE STRUCTURE

 

1 DAY TRAINING COURSE

  • Introductions & Welcome

  • Flixborough & Seveso Disasters

  • Lower & Upper Tier Sites

  • Overview of the COMAH Regulations

  • The role of the Competent Authority

  • The Safety Report

  • Group Exercise

  • Emergency Plans & Information

  • Safety Management Systems

WEB BASED THE FOLLOWING WEEK

  • Summary of the Learning Outcomes

  • Suggested Further Reading

  • Learning Outcomes Quiz

LEARNING  OUTCOMES

BY THE END OF THE PROGRAMME, DELEGATES WILL BE ABLE TO:

  • Describe the key concepts of hazard, failure event, and consequence;

  • Understand the underlying factors that led to the Flixborough, Piper Alpha and Buncefield disasters and the lessons for engineering teams making design and operational decisions;

  • Describe the role of process safety barriers in reducing the hazard, likelihood of failure, and consequences on major accident hazard facilities;

  • Use the Process Safety Framework to aid decisions on risk identification and reduction;

  • Describe the Hierarchy of Controls and be able to apply it in practical situations;

  • Understand their legal responsibility of reducing risk to a level considered ALARP and apply it in a practical way;

  • Understand the mechanisms of fire and explosions;

  • Describe the main components of relief and blowdown systems and the factors that affect their performance;

  • Describe the main functional requirements of safety instrumented systems;

  • Identify the performance requirements of emergency shutdown systems and the importance of fire & gas detection systems in reducing consequences;

  • Describe the fundamental concepts of the Management of Change (MoC) process;

  • Understand the main concepts in risk assessment;

  • Apply understanding of process safety framework to complete risk assessments.

 
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COLIN DEDDIS

CEng FIChemE
COURSE FACILITATOR

Colin is a Chartered Engineer and Fellow of the IChemE. He has spent the past 28 years in the oil and gas industry in a variety of senior technical roles in upstream oil and gas production to downstream oil refining and gas processing. Most recently, Colin was Global Technical Authority for Process Engineering and Technical Safety in Spirit Energy.  He was previously a lecturer in Chemical Engineering Design at the University of Cambridge and is currently an Industrial Visiting Professor at the University of Strathclyde.

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DR NEILL RENTON

CEng FIChemE
COURSE LEADER

A Fellow of the IChemE, Neill has over 23 years’ experience as a Chemical Engineer in a range of operational, academic, and project roles in the oil & gas and downstream industries.  He has led international multidisciplinary project teams for field development projects and has offshore experience in the UKCS, Norway, Gulf of Mexico and Brazil.  Prior to joining RCLD, Neill was Operations Director at Genesis and Head of Chemical Engineering at the University of Aberdeen where he is still an Honorary Senior Lecturer.

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BRYAN FORD

COURSE FACILITATOR

Bryan has over 40 years’ experience in the Oil & Gas and Chemicals industries in a range of technical and operational roles.  Over half of this time was spent offshore in roles including Offshore Installation Manager (OIM) on several installations for a major North Sea operator. His onshore roles have included Engineering Assurance Manager and most recently Technical & Process Safety Manager.  Bryan was a member of Energy Institute Scientific Technical Advisory Committee for over five years and a member of a number of Oil & Gas UK committees.

 

WHO IS THE COURSE AIMED AT

The course is aimed at all engineering professionals in any discipline who have responsibilities for delivering Process Safety in practice.

HOW THE COURSE RUNS

  • Blended course delivery

  • 3 one-day workshops 

  • Workshops spaced 1 month apart

  • 8hrs LMS collaboration

  • Online learning community

  • Learning Outcomes tested

COST

The course cost is £2150 (ex.VAT) per delegate. Payment can be made by credit/debit card or by Invoice.

Price includes attendance at all three workshops, access to online learning community, course materials, refreshments, and lunch on workshop dates.

 

WORKSHOP DATES

AUTUMN PROGRAMME

Workshop 1: 26th September 

Workshop 2: 30th October 

Workshop 3: 28th November

Delegates attend all three workshops.

IN-HOUSE OPTION

We also run this course for companies as an in-house training programme.  Contact course co-ordinator GillIan Wells for more information or a quotation.

TERMS & CONDITIONS

  • Refunds can be given up to 7 days prior to the start of the first workshop

  • Facilitators and course material can change up to the day of the workshop

  • If you miss a workshop we will offer you a place on the next running of the course